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Op-Ed

Bringing back the board game

They never really disappeared. They just became mainstream. Article: Farron Ager – Oped Editor I was at a friend’s house, teaching them how to play a board game I picked up roughly six months ago, “Betrayal at House on the Hill”. Essentially, the game has six players exploring a haunted house, uncovering tiles until some bad mojo goes down and someone is revealed to be the haunter, the antagonist trying to kill off the remaining ...

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Sweater Split

How a sweater became the centre of a controversy Article: Brady Lang – Sports Writer his phrase has been garnering much attention in the news lately due to a girl at Balcarres Community School, the high school I graduated from in June of 2013. I don’t think that there could be anyone else out there who could actually understand Balcarres Community School other than a former student. The demographics of the school are about 65% ...

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It’s only the Golden Globes

“Just like the Oscars, just without the esteem.” Article: Ravinesh Sakaran – Contributor o, the 71st Annual Golden Globes just aired last Sunday, and man was I ecstatic to see Matthew McConaughey win Best Dramatic Film Actor for his portrayal of Ron Woodruf, a homophobic and racist electrician who is zealous in his efforts to find unconventional treatments after being diagnosed as H.I.V positive, in the movie Dallas Buyers Club. Jared Leto bagged the movie ...

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Advanced Thinking

Dangerous inventions miss the point of progress Article: Dietrich Neu – Contributor ikhail Kalashnikov, the creator of the infamous AK-47 assault rifle, died last month. The AK-47 was one of the most culturally significant weapons in history. It’s the choice of guerrilla fighters and trained soldiers the world over, it’s remarkably light, rarely jams, and can cost as little as $200 in markets like Africa and the Middle East. The gun is so simple, children ...

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My NASH experience

Journalism conference leaves sour taste in student’s mouth Article: Autumn McDowell – Sports Editor hile many of my current colleagues are getting ready to head to NASH, the student journalism conference put on by the Canadian University Press, I am being reminded of what a terrible time I had at said conference two years ago. Yes, I was one of the lucky ones to take part in the Victoria, “barfapalooza” of 2012. When I first ...

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The beauty of photography

Article: Michael Chmielewski – Editor-in-Chief ’ve solidified an addiction over the holiday break. I probably would have never taken it up had I not started working at the Carillon, because it is here that I was exposed to the beauty, and art, of photography. Never before had I really considered using photography as an expressive outlet. I’ve used language tropes and genres in almost all its forms, and I’ve also written and performed music as ...

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For unlawful carnal knowledge

What makes “fuck” such a “dirty word?” Article: Kyle Leitch – Production Manager he holidays are a little unusual for me. While most people are decking the halls and fa-la-la-la-la-ing, I’m usually decking faces and burning down Christmas displays. In case you didn’t get it, I have a miserly air about me from Nov. 30 until at least Jan. 07. People that know me well know that I have a “problem” with my language. Whereas ...

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Boring Sask Politics

Article: John Murney – Contributor askatchewan had quite a year politically in 2013 – quite boring, that is. When this year is measured up against all others in our province’s past, this one will be largely unremarkable. Don’t get me wrong, reaching the milestone of 1.1-million people and leading Canada with Alberta in economic growth makes me very proud to be from Saskatchewan. But, this type of news makes for boring politics. Maybe in a ...

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NAFTA’s 20th overrated?

The need to study social rather than individual actions Article: Taras Matkovsky – Contributor ecently, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) became 20 years old. Signed in 1993, it was a deal that saw the elimination of tariffs between the United States and its immediate neighbours, Canada and Mexico.  This deal was one of the byproducts of the dominance of neoliberalism at the time. With the elite sectors of the Western world viewing regulated markets ...

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