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Work hard for the money

Summer jobs provide more than a paycheque

Summer has gone by far too quick.

No, I haven’t been partying, taking long trips to Hawaii, or doing anything overly adventurous to take up my time. I’ve been working – 3 jobs to be exact, 2 of which are jobs I picked up for the summer. The crazy thing is, I wouldn’t trade it for anything. I have had a lot of fun forming connections, building myself as a person, and preparing myself for life through my work. Every student should apply for a summer job once their break from school starts. Aside from my personal standpoint on summer jobs, whether people like to admit it or not, sorry anti-capitalists, but the first and most notable benefit of summer employment is those beautiful dollar signs that everybody loves to see grow in their bank account.

We live in a world where almost everything costs something. Someone who sits at home and plays Call of Duty: Modern Warfare all day and night will generally make less money than someone who works 40 hours a week – unless you’re Donald Trump’s kids, but let’s get back to reality here. Money is clearly one of the greatest benefits of a summer job and is most notably at the root of almost every summer job. But there are plenty of other benefits to summer jobs than just those multicolored bills in your pocket.


"It takes initiative, motivation, and maybe a kick in the ass to put down the Xbox controller, get up, and get a job other than trying to achieve the 80th level of prestige in Call of Duty."


When most students finish their post-secondary education, they will begin their long-awaited career of full-time employment, thus arguably taking their final step into adulthood. A summer job is an excellent taste of what real life is like. Summer employment is a way of preparing yourself for the real world, and the earlier you partake in summer employment, the more opportunity you have to build yourself as a person, get the most out of your summer job, and prepare for that big event called ‘life’.

Whether it’s being friendly, working harder than expected, or just coming into your job with a smile on your face and displaying great charisma, getting the most out of a summer job lies solely on a positive attitude. This kind of attitude can lead to further job opportunities, making new friends, and many other positive benefits like perhaps continuing to work with your summer employer through the fall and winter, that one can achieve through their 3 to 4 month work term.

The rewards of a summer job run deeper than just money; they can help you develop as a person. It takes initiative, motivation, and maybe a kick in the ass to put down the Xbox controller, get up, and get a job other than trying to achieve the 80th level of prestige in Call of Duty.

Colton Hordichuk
Contributor

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