The Owl isn’t the only club on campus

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[2B]clubsOh, the other kind of club

Braden Dupuis
Sports Writer

Do you ever feel that your university existence is unfulfilling? Are you buried under the stress of papers, assignments, and exams? Are your knees buckling under the weight of that mysterious beer gut that somehow attached itself to your rippling abs while you weren’t looking last semester? The answer for you, my fat, unmotivated friend, is to get involved with a university club.

There are dozens of clubs here on campus, ranging from belly dancing to karate, but they all share one common characteristic.

“I think ultimately they all provide university students with opportunities to engage in a specific sport or activity that’s of common interest, that ultimately enhances and enriches the student’s university life experience,” said John Papandreos, coordinator of recreation services for the U of R.

But, what if nobody wants my fat, unwashed body stinking up their karate club, John? Can I start my own?

“Students interested in forming a varsity or recreational club can do so by applying formally with URSU to become a formally recognized and accredited club on campus,” Papandreos said. “It’s a very simple process and they have guidelines set out on their website.”

I do appreciate when things are simplified and streamlined.

Are there any restrictions to what kind of club I can form? Does my BASEketball club stand a chance at making it through the approval process?

“Absolutely, if there’s a common interest and students are willing to join,” Papandreos assured my swollen, mouth-breathing face, before offering an example from another school, where students have started a Quidditch club. 


“I think ultimately they all provide university students with opportunities to engage in a specific sport or activity that’s of common interest, that ultimately enhances and enriches the student’s university life experience.” – John Papandreos


“They’ve come up with a variation of that in a gym using touch football flags and stuff and it’s kind of cool, so that’s kind of out-of-the-box thinking,” Papandreos said. “If you feel that you can generate enough student interest … students can pretty much form whatever club that they so choose.”

But, alas, there are some exceptions to the rule.

Papandreos noted that clubs that may present unnecessary safety risks, like a mixed martial arts club or a rodeo club may be rejected.

“But, aside from that, if the students’ union is willing to endorse a particular club, that’s [their] call,”  He said. “We still reserve the right whether or not we’re going to sort of sanction them to go and represent our school in a formal competition or not.”

And, therein lies another benefit to university club life – the chance to compete for glory against some of the best that North America has to offer.

The U of R Rugby club, for example, recently went to Las Vegas to compete against some of the best schools in the United States, including the University of Oklahoma Sooners and the University of Texas Longhorns.

“These are big schools that you see on TV in NCAA basketball and football and stuff, and here the University of Regina, gosh knows they probably don’t have a frickin’ clue where we’re from, are competing against some schools that the rest of our intervarsity athletic program would never dream of competing against, you know?” Papandreos said. “So think of how their experience has been broadened because of the opportunities to compete against some major U.S. schools.”

But, it doesn’t stop there.

Some clubs, like the U of R curling club, or our highly-touted cheerleading team, have gone on to compete on the world stage.

It’s a golden opportunity that never would have presented itself had they not put down that dollar draft and signed up to participate.

So, head on over to the recreation services website and check out what they’ve got to offer.

Your fat ass will thank you.

Photo by Arthur Ward

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